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Barbara Rosene

Barbara Rosene taps an all-star line up of musicians and arrangers for this treasure trove of tunes. Champion guitarists James Chirillo and Howard Alden take turns with their plectrum and arrangement talents on such songs as "Where Are You?," "Almost in Your Arms," "Did You Ever See a Dream Walking?," "Perfidia," and "There Well Never Be Another You." Guitar fans, these are your moments.

The focus, of course, is Barbara Rosene's singing which more than capitalizes on the fine arrangements, including those done by Ray Machiarola, Wycliffe Gordon and Randy Sandke. Great recordings such as this, like any musical ensemble is the result of successful collaboration and, again, this is an exemplary effort. "Frigidaire," exhibits yet another talent, that of Rosene's abilities as a composer. Sandke's muted trumpet sound adds just the right feeling for the hot-ice message of the lyric. "Theme From Picnic," reprises those memorable dance scenes of Kim Novak and William Holden, adding new insights to the romance of that union. Rosene provides her own special interpretation of the soundtrack, augmenting again Alden's subdued but evocative arrangement. Gordon's trombone solo kicks in at just the right time with just the right wailing tones. Alden's interpretation of "There Will Never Be Another You," solidifies his multitudinous talents. Although the verse is often overlooked, its inclusion here adds appropriate emphasis and meaning to this wonderful inexhaustible old song, enhanced in the upbeat section by Gordon.

For this listener's money, the prize track is "That Sunday, That Summer," where both Rosene and Chirillo excel at their offerings. Chirillo's solo is perfectly charming, played with just the right number and nature of notes in just the right mix of lines, chord melody, and voicings. Joel Forbes' bass, too, is right on for the temper of the tune.

All in all, musicians, arrangements, vocals, tune selection ? This is a AAA winner!

Bob Gish, Jazz Inside, January 2013

"Barbara Rosene has an ideal voice for singing songs of the 1920s and 30s. Although she often sings the popular songs of the '20s and early '30s (in my opinion, better than Annette Hanshaw or Ruth Etting), her laid-back, mellow voice does just as well with these light jazz/romantic songs of the 30's and 40's. Her rendition of "You Are Too Beautiful" is plain awesome. She has no intonation, phrases her songs meaningfully, and never over-exaggerates. She's just the best."

Fans on Amazon

"Barbara Rosene has an ideal voice for singing songs of the 1920s and '30s. Although she often sings the popular songs of the '20s and early '30s (in my opinion, better than Annette Hanshaw or Ruth Etting), her laid-back, mellow voice does just as well with these light jazz/romantic songs of the '30s and '40s. Her rendition of "You Are Too Beautiful" is plain awesome. She has no intonation, phrases her songs meaningfully, and never over-exaggerates. She's just the best."

Barry McCanna

 

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